The Author (Episode 20)

Dear Kingsley,
        It is with great gusto and unspeakable euphoria that I write to you this day.
        I want to use this medium to inform you that the Nigerian brewery, your supplier and the prostitutes at Hilltop Valley are about to lose their biggest market as I intend to end your miserable life.
        You’ve been literally living a wasted life. You can’t boast of being sober for at least, two hours in a day. I even doubt that you’d be sober enough to read this letter but I’m writing this letter anyway, as I did for others before you.
        Thank you for giving me the opportunity to end your miserable life and liberate you from your suffering. You’ve been a waste of Hilltop Valley’s social amenities.
                                   
                                    Yours murderly,
                                    The Author

 

Kingsley Okon was the last child of his parents. He had a brother and a sister. Kingsley had been by far, the most intelligent among his siblings. His parents were always very proud of him and they went out of their way to ensure that he went to the best schools.
However, Kingsley, though brilliant, didn’t enjoy his primary and secondary schooling as his parents had expected because of bullying. Kingsley had been handsome and lanky. He was constantly bullied in school by some students who were jealous of either his intelligence or his good looks or both. Kingsley endured the bullying in silence and managed to maintain his good grades throughout his primary and secondary schooling.
In the University however, Kingsley decided to do something about the bullying. He had gotten fed up with the incessant intimidation by cultists in the University of Nigeria Nsukka. He had been admitted into the University of Nigeria to study Pharmacy and in his first year, he had been robbed twice by cultists. A friend advised him to join a fraternity to ensure his security in the University and he agreed. He joined the Lions cult which was the most popular and powerful cult at that time.
After joining the cult, he started engaging in nefarious activities to the detriment of his academics. Kingsley, who was formerly a teetotaler, started frequenting the bar so much that he was nicknamed ‘The Barrister’. In his fourth year, he became a top ranking member of the Lions cult and started intimidating everyone on campus, both students and lecturers alike. He met his Waterloo when he and two of his men seriously beat up a student who turned out to be the only son of the Inspector General of Police in a bar brawl. The situation became more complicated when the Inspector General’s son died as he was being transported to the hospital. An intense manhunt was organised for Kingsley and the other two persons by the police. Kingsley’s men were apprehended by the police, the next day. Kingsley was lucky to escape because he’d gone for a walk when the police stormed their building. Fearing possible life imprisonment, he immediately left Enugu. He guessed that the police would probably look for him at home, so he stayed away from his family and moved to Hilltop Valley in the outskirts of Akwa Ibom State where he was relatively unknown. He engaged in small scale armed robbery to survive  and used part of the money he made after a while to open a small bar that became highly patronised when he partnered with the prostitutes at the Hilltop Valley after some years. Kings bar became a meeting point for prostitutes and their customers and both Kingsley and the prostitutes benefitted from the increased patronage.
Kingsley could have been wealthy with all the money he was making, had he not been suffering from drug and alcohol addiction. He used most of his money to purchase scarce opiates at exorbitant prices as he couldn’t do without them. He usually consumed a sizeable amount of the alcohol stock in his bar.
As a result of his frequent intoxication, he was unable to effectively supervise the activities of of his staff who embezzled money right under his nose. Kingsley was never sober enough to care. All he cared about were his drugs, alcohol and women. As part of their deal, he actually enjoyed the services of the prostitutes free of charge whenever he was up to it.

The Author had paid a young man going into the Kings bar to give Kingsley the letter. The young man had dropped the letter at Kingsley’s table before going to order his drink. At this point, Kingsley was so intoxicated that he couldn’t make out a single word in the letter. He put the letter in his pocket and decided that he’d read it when he was sober.

‘I guessed as much. I knew that he would be too intoxicated to read. Well, it doesn’t matter. I’ll kill him when the opportunity presents itself’, the Author thought. He was wearing a black cap alongside his blue t-shirt and black jean trouser. He had entered the bar and was observing Kingsley from his position, five tables away.

The Author was not the only man observing Kingsley. Two men who were casually dressed in t-shirts and basketball shorts were also watching Kingsley. They were seated three tables away from him and had seen him try to read the letter from the Author. One of them had immediately brought out his phone and sent a message to their boss: ‘The Author has probably gotten to Kingsley. A letter was just delivered to him. What are our orders?’. Their boss sent a reply: ‘Kill Kingsley ASAP. If the Author surfaces, kill him too’. ‘Yes sir’, the man acknowledged. He turned to his partner and informed him of their boss’ orders.
‘We’re a go’, he said.

 

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